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Fast Facts (Tobago)

By

Ins & Outs of Trinidad & Tobago

May 16, 2022


Fast Facts


TRINIDAD

Capital: Port of Spain

Main Towns: City of San Fernando, Arima, Point Fortin, Chaguanas


TOBAGO

Capital: Scarborough


OFFICIAL LANGUAGE: English


POPULATION: 1,359,193 (CSO: 2018 Mid-year population estimate)


ELECTRICITY: 110 volts/220 volts (+/-6%); 60 Hz


TELEPHONE: 1 (868) + seven-digit local


TELECOMMUNICATIONS

State-owned Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago (TSTT) has traditionally been the major provider of landline and mobile telephone services. Providers of such services are now prevalent on both islands, and cable television and internet services are readily available. The more prominent agencies are Digicel (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited (Digicel) and Columbus Communications Trinidad Limited (Flow). Wireless internet services are commonplace at hotels, restaurants and many other establishments.

International Access Code: 1

Country Code: 868



GEOGRAPHY AND LOCATION

Tucked below the hurricane belt, the country is located in a safe haven. It is bordered by the Caribbean Sea in the north and by the Atlantic to the east. On the west coast, it is separated from Venezuela by the Gulf of Paria and to the south, the Columbus Channel.


TRINIDAD

Once attached to the South American mainland, Trinidad is situated at 12 km (7 miles) northeast of the coast of Venezuela and is separated from it by the Gulf of Paria. Trinidad has three mountain ranges — the Northern Range, the Central Range and the Southern Range. The highest point, El Cerro del Aripo, is 940 m (3,084 ft) above sea level. About 40% of all land is undeveloped forest and woodlands, although the island continues to experience rapid development. Trinidad’s Pitch Lake is the largest natural reservoir of asphalt in

the world.

Total Area: 4,828 km2 (1,864 sq miles)

81.25 km long by 57-73 km wide

(50 miles by 35-45 miles)

Location: Latitude 10.5° N; Longitude 61.5° W


TOBAGO

Tobago lies 34 km (21 miles) northeast of Trinidad. Though of volcanic origin, there are no active volcanoes here. The island is a single mountain mass, although the southwestern tip has a coral platform. The highest peak, the Main Ridge, reaches an elevation of about 576 m (1,890 ft) and its lower lying lands include a protected reserve area. The coastline is broken up by inlets and sheltered beaches, and there are several uninhabited islets.

Total Area: 300 sq km (116 sq miles)

Location: Latitude 11.5° N, Longitude 60.5°W


CLIMATE

Trinidad and Tobago has a tropical climate with high relative humidity. There are two distinct seasons: dry, from January to May and wet, from June to December. There is a short dry period around mid-September called Petit Carême. The hurricane season runs from June to November, peaking between August and October. Given Trinidad’s southern geographical location, the island is not affected by storms as frequently as the sister isle, Tobago. Tobago can experience inclement weather as a result of such weather systems. Trinidad and Tobago’s southerly location keeps temperatures consistent year-round, about 30/32 °C (86/90 °F) during the day and somewhat cooler at night.


CULTURE

The festivals, music, customs, cuisine, religions and races of Trinidad and Tobago reflect a rich and unique cultural diversity. The nation has a passionate and colourful history spanning five centuries. Festivals and religious and cultural observances include Divali (the Hindu festival of lights), Eid-ul-Fitr (Muslim festival marking the end of the fast of Ramadan), Emancipation Day (which commemorates the emancipation of enslaved people of African descent), Indian Arrival Day (which commemorates the arrival of the first Indian Indentured labourers from India to Trinidad) and Corpus Christi (Catholic festival in honour of the Eucharist).

Trinidad Carnival is a world-famous event that brings together artists, musicians, masqueraders and revellers for a month-long celebration that culminates in a two-day parade.

http://www.culture.gov.tt/



BANKING

The financial system consists of commercial banks, trust and mortgage finance companies, finance houses and merchant banks.

Number of Commercial Banks: 8

Number of Branches: 123

Number of Automatic Banking Machines: 254 ATMs


BANK HOURS OF OPERATION

City Centres: Monday to Thursday – 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Friday – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

RBC and Scotiabank (not mall branches): 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

8 RBC Branches open on Saturday: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Shopping Centres (Daily): 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Exchange Rate: TT$6.79: US$1 (February 2021)


ECO-TOURISM

Trinidad and Tobago, although relatively distinct ecologically, are both blessed with rich natural environments well suited for ecotourism. Once part of the South American mainland, Trinidad’s flora and fauna have comingled, leading to a great density of plant and animal types in a relatively small location.

Trinidad and Tobago has more than 97 mammal species, 400 bird species, 90 reptile species, 30 amphibian species, 600 butterfly species and over 2,100 species of flowering plants. The island’s nature reserves attract major international traffic from naturalists and nature watchers. The terrain is just as diverse, with tropical rainforests, mangrove swamps, mountainous terrain and savannahs.

Birdwatching is a major attraction in Tobago as well, with Little Tobago island recognised as one of the Caribbean’s top seabird sanctuaries.

Tobago is also a hub of aquatic tourism. The waters off the island are a haven for wildlife, an attraction for both divers and boat tourists. Buccoo Reef (a large coral reef and protected marine park) is a popular destination. Tobago’s Main Ridge Forest is known to be the oldest protected rainforest.

http://www.tourism.gov.tt/

www.insandoutstt.com


MEETING PLACES AND CONFERENCE CENTRES

Trinidad and Tobago is one of the top five Caribbean meeting and conference destinations.

Many hotels have facilities for conferences, including international brands such as the Hyatt Regency Trinidad and the Hilton Trinidad and Conference Centre.

In addition, the state-of-the-art National Academy for the Performing Arts (NAPA), South Academy for the Performing Arts, award-winning spots like Coco Reef and the Magdalena Grand Beach Resort in Tobago are ideal for corporate meetings and team-building retreats.

For further information visit:

Trinidad For Business - Meetings Events Conferences | Visit Trinidad

Find out best meeting & event locations, conference facilities & investment options in Trinidad. A place where deals are made & business gets booming!


PUBLIC UTILITIES ELECTRICITY

Trinidad and Tobago has a reliable supply of electricity with rates still among the lowest in the Caribbean. The domestic and commercial supply voltage is 110/220 volts, 60 cycles. The Trinidad and Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC) is the agency responsible for the country’s electrical supply.

http://www.ttec.co.tt/


WATER

The Water and Sewerage Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (WASA), a State enterprise, is the sole provider of water and wastewater services in Trinidad and Tobago.

http://www.wasa.gov.tt/


POST/COURIER SERVICES

Regular mail, express mail and courier delivery are reliable and available from local provider TTPost at excellent rates. International courier services are efficient and readily available.

http://www.ttpost.net/


IMMIGRATION, WORK PERMITS AND VISAS

Visitors to Trinidad and Tobago must possess valid passports and return or ongoing tickets for successful entry. Most Commonwealth countries do not require visas for entry, except Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Cameroon, Fiji Islands, Mozambique, Uganda and South Africa. For business travel and vacations lasting 90 days or less (within 180-day period) European Union citizens do not need visas for entry. The same applies for nationals from non- European Union Schengen countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland). Holders of CARICOM passports, with the exception of Haiti, do not require visas. Visitors from several other countries are allowed to enter Trinidad and Tobago for periods of up to three months without a visa.

http://www.immigration.gov.tt/

Work permits are required for business stays beyond 30 days. Visa extensions can be obtained from the Immigration Office at 67 Frederick Street, Port of Spain, while work permits can be obtained from the Ministry of National Security, Temple Court II, 52-60 Abercromby Street, Port of Spain.

www.nationalsecurity.gov.tt


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